Study on multicenter open-label randomized clinical trial of favipiravir to evaluate the viral load reduction effect in asymptomatic and mild patients with SARS-CoV2 infection/A multicenter observational study to evaluate the clinical course of moderate and severe patients receiving favipiravir

  • Funded by Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED)
  • Total publications:0 publications

Grant number: unknown

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Key facts

  • Disease

    COVID-19
  • Start & end year

    2019
    2019
  • Funder

    Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED)
  • Principle Investigator

    Pending
  • Research Location

    Japan, Western Pacific
  • Lead Research Institution

    Fujita Health University Hospital, Japan
  • Research Category

    Therapeutics research, development and implementation

  • Research Subcategory

    Prophylactic use of treatments

  • Special Interest Tags

    Gender

  • Study Subject

    Clinical

  • Clinical Trial Details

    Randomized Controlled Trial

  • Broad Policy Alignment

    Pending

  • Age Group

    Unspecified

  • Vulnerable Population

    Unspecified

  • Occupations of Interest

    Unspecified

Abstract

Favipiravir is an antiviral drug created by Toyama Chemical Co., Ltd. (Fujifilm Toyama Chemical Co., Ltd.) It was approved by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in March 2014, limiting the indications and effects to "emerging or re-emerging influenza virus infections (only if other anti-influenza virus drugs are ineffective or insufficiently effective)." The mechanism of action is that triphosphorylated form (T-705RTP) converted in vivo selectively inhibits viral RNA polymerase, so it is expected to be effective against RNA viruses other than influenza virus, but there is no evidence of utility for SARS-CoV2 infection. The aim of this research is to clarify the usefulness of favipiravir for asymptomatic and mild patients with SARS-CoV2 infection and the clinical course of moderate and severe patients receiving favipiravir by Specified Clinical Research