OxVent Prototype Ventilator

  • Funded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)
  • Total publications:0 publications

Grant number: IAA-OXF-2

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Key facts

  • Disease

    COVID-19
  • Funder

    UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)
  • Principle Investigator

    Pending
  • Research Location

    United Kingdom, Europe
  • Lead Research Institution

    industries in Peru.
  • Research Category

    Clinical characterisation and management

  • Research Subcategory

    Supportive care, processes of care and management

  • Special Interest Tags

    Gender

  • Study Subject

    Non-Clinical

  • Clinical Trial Details

    N/A

  • Broad Policy Alignment

    Pending

  • Age Group

    Not Applicable

  • Vulnerable Population

    Not applicable

  • Occupations of Interest

    Not applicable

Abstract

Impact Acceleration Account Funding: OxVent Prototype Ventilator:OxVent is a multidisciplinary team of engineers and medics at the University of Oxford and King's College London. The team has been shortlisted by the UK government to go to the next stage of testing for safety and usability for their ventilator prototype.A team, led by Oxford Professor Andrew Farmery, Engineering Science Professors Mark Thompson and Alfonso Castrejon-Pita and DPhil student Rob Staruch, and King's College London's Professor Sebastien Ourselin and Dr Federico Formenti, have defined a simple, safe and scalable design that will meet the strict specifications for use with patients. The design will exploit off-the-shelf components and equipment with elements that can be produced through 3D printing techniques.If the ventilator passes the required MHRA safety tests, it will rapidly move into production with the medical manufacturing company, Smith and Nephew (S&N) based in Hull.This green light enables the team to test their prototype ventilators, developed in response to the coronavirus pandemic and forecasted acute shortage of ventilators. The next stage would be the manufacture of 6,000 ventilators and deployment through the NHS. The design could also be used in other healthcare settings.