Human alveolar barrier damage in COVID 19 associated lung failure

  • Funded by Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung [German Federal Ministry of Education and Research] (BMBF)
  • Total publications:1 publications

Grant number: 01KI2082

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Key facts

  • Disease

    COVID-19
  • Start & end year

    2020
    2021
  • Known Financial Commitments (USD)

    $54,137.02
  • Funder

    Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung [German Federal Ministry of Education and Research] (BMBF)
  • Principle Investigator

    Pending
  • Research Location

    Germany, Europe
  • Lead Research Institution

    Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin
  • Research Category

    Clinical characterisation and management

  • Research Subcategory

    Disease pathogenesis

  • Special Interest Tags

    Gender

  • Study Subject

    Non-Clinical

  • Clinical Trial Details

    N/A

  • Broad Policy Alignment

    Pending

  • Age Group

    Not Applicable

  • Vulnerable Population

    Not applicable

  • Occupations of Interest

    Not applicable

Abstract

Abstract: The aim of the project is to investigate whether the body's own substances are responsible for the damage to the lung tissue in COVID-19 patients who suffer from the so-called "Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome" (ARDS). The investigation is to be carried out in the laboratory on lung cells. In addition, the aim is to investigate whether the suspected mechanism of action that triggers ARDS can be inhibited by an active ingredient that has already been tested in clinical studies for other indications. In the short to medium term, such studies could provide important insights for the treatment of severe cases of COVID-19. If the project is successful, a starting point for the development of a therapeutic agent could be identified in the medium to long term.; Research Type: discovery; Study population: not applicable

Publicationslinked via Europe PMC

Last Updated:41 minutes ago

View all publications at Europe PMC

A proteomic survival predictor for COVID-19 patients in intensive care.