REGULATION OF MEMORY T CELL TRAFFICKING BY CORE 2 O-GLYCAN SYNTHESIS

  • Funded by National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Total publications:0 publications

Grant number: 3R01AI132404-03S1

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Key facts

  • Disease

    COVID-19
  • Start & end year

    2020
    2021
  • Known Financial Commitments (USD)

    $381,463
  • Funder

    National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Principle Investigator

    Pending
  • Research Location

    United States of America, Americas
  • Lead Research Institution

    OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY
  • Research Category

    Vaccines research, development and implementation

  • Research Subcategory

    Pre-clinical studies

  • Special Interest Tags

    Gender

  • Study Subject

    Non-Clinical

  • Clinical Trial Details

    N/A

  • Broad Policy Alignment

    Pending

  • Age Group

    Not Applicable

  • Vulnerable Population

    Not applicable

  • Occupations of Interest

    Not applicable

Abstract

The current COVID-19 pandemic is a global health emergency, causing severe respiratory disease requiringhospitalization and even death in a significant proportion of the Human population. Although therapeuticintervention including novel pharmaceuticals or the passive transfer of immune serum from recovered patientscould provide short-term relief in mortality and morbidity, the development of a successful vaccine willultimately be required to prevent the continued spread and seasonal recurrence of this disease within theHuman population. However, very little is known about either the quality of adaptive immune response or theviral antigen targets that are necessary to prevent the infection. Here we propose to evaluate a novelvaccination approach recently developed in my laboratory that we will now apply to SARS-CoV-2. Specifically,we will generate Vaccinia virus (VacV) vectors expressing the SARS-CoV-2 Spike (S) protein that have beenengineered to targeted the S protein for MHC-II presentation. Overall, this study will evaluate whether VacVexpressing SARS-CoV-2 S protein could be a potential vaccine candidate and whether the "immunogenicity" ofthe S protein can be enhanced by targeting the protein for MHC-II presentation.