Characterizing SARS-CoV-2 infection of human taste cells in culture

  • Funded by National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Total publications:0 publications

Grant number: unknown

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Key facts

  • Disease

    COVID-19
  • Start & end year

    2015
    2020
  • Known Financial Commitments (USD)

    $174,487
  • Funder

    National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Principle Investigator

    Pending
  • Research Location

    United States of America, Americas
  • Lead Research Institution

    MONELL CHEMICAL SENSES CENTER
  • Research Category

    Pathogen: natural history, transmission and diagnostics

  • Research Subcategory

    Pathogen morphology, shedding & natural history

  • Special Interest Tags

    Gender

  • Study Subject

    Non-Clinical

  • Clinical Trial Details

    N/A

  • Broad Policy Alignment

    Pending

  • Age Group

    Not Applicable

  • Vulnerable Population

    Not applicable

  • Occupations of Interest

    Not applicable

Abstract

AbstractRelatedness of Supplement Aim to Parent GrantIn the parent grant, we use cultured human taste (HBO) cells, pioneered at Monell by Co-Investigator HakanOzdener, to probe the metabolic sweet taste signaling pathway. HBO cells provide a useful model for probingtaste signaling in culture, but they have also been shown useful for investigating the pathophysiology of certainneurotrophic viral diseases (e.g. Zika virus; see Ozdener et al., 2020). Using HBO cells to accomplish theSupplement Aim will advance our understanding of the pathogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses thatadversely affect taste and olfaction. Although many studies have reported taste and olfactory loss in individualswith COVID-19 disease, the underlying mechanisms and cellular effects in taste cells are not well understood.Due to changes in taste function in patients with COVID-19, it will be of particular interest to the parent grant toknow if the subset of sweet taste cells is susceptible to infection by SARS-CoV-2.