A Highly Specific Point-of-Care Rapid Real-time Sensing Device for COVID-19

  • Funded by National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Total publications:0 publications

Grant number: unknown

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Key facts

  • Disease

    COVID-19
  • Start & end year

    2019
    2021
  • Known Financial Commitments (USD)

    $70,380
  • Funder

    National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Principle Investigator

    Pending
  • Research Location

    United States of America, Americas
  • Lead Research Institution

    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALT CO CAMPUS
  • Research Category

    Pathogen: natural history, transmission and diagnostics

  • Research Subcategory

    Diagnostics

  • Special Interest Tags

    Gender

  • Study Subject

    Non-Clinical

  • Clinical Trial Details

    N/A

  • Broad Policy Alignment

    Pending

  • Age Group

    Not Applicable

  • Vulnerable Population

    Not applicable

  • Occupations of Interest

    Not applicable

Abstract

ABSTRACTSince the first case of COVID-19 was reported in the United States (U.S.) on January 21st, 2020, it has alreadybeen ascertained to affect >900K active cases with >50K deaths. Currently, COVID-19 is being diagnosedprimarily by three techniques, i.e. reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), genesequencing and chest computed tomography (CT). However, limitations of sample collection andtransportation, as well as kit performance with inadequate access to advanced instrumental techniques, oftencannot report COVID-19 at its initial presentation leading to the spread of this infectious disease to a widercommunity. Moreover, researchers found at least three central variants, distinguishable by amino acidchanges, among 160 different complete human SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences. This limits the universalapplicability of the currently available commercial COVID-19 kits. In this proposal we present a novel approachfor screening of active COVID-19 cases with an electrochemical quantitative biosensor. This unique approachfor selective sensing of SARS-CoV-2 eliminates the possibility of misinterpretation arisen due to the genomicvariants of this virus which is the most concerning limitation of the current COVID-19 sensing kits. Weanticipate that our sensor can detect the specific target nucleic acid sequences without signal cross talk witha detection limit to be around 50 fg/ml with time of response to be around 2-3 mins.