Prospective cohort study of non-hospitalised COVID-19 patients: determining length of isolation and patient clinical development at home (COVID-HOME study)

  • Funded by Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (ZonMW)
  • Total publications:0 publications

Grant number: 1.043E+13

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Key facts

  • Disease

    COVID-19
  • Start & end year

    2020
    2021
  • Known Financial Commitments (USD)

    $900,173.96
  • Funder

    Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (ZonMW)
  • Principle Investigator

    Pending
  • Research Location

    Netherlands, Europe
  • Lead Research Institution

    University Medical Center Groningen
  • Research Category

    Epidemiological studies

  • Research Subcategory

    Disease transmission dynamics

  • Special Interest Tags

    Gender

  • Study Subject

    Clinical

  • Clinical Trial Details

    Not applicable

  • Broad Policy Alignment

    Pending

  • Age Group

    Unspecified

  • Vulnerable Population

    Unspecified

  • Occupations of Interest

    Unspecified

Abstract

Project description The UMCG conducts research among COVID-19 patients who have not been admitted to a hospital and their family members. The researchers want to gain more insight into the impact and consequences of the disease on these patients and their families, in order to be able to use this information to make guidelines for the treatment of COVID-19 patients at home. Study Positively tested individuals are visited at home weekly to obtain clinical and laboratory data. This is done by, among other things, taking a nose / throat swab (cotton swab) and drawing blood. To see if the virus is spreading through other routes, urine, faeces and semen or vaginal swabs are also collected. Nose and throat swabs are also taken from family members of positively tested persons to determine whether and when they become infected. Importance The necessity and importance of this investigation is great in the current phase of relaxation of all measures and the possible new outbreaks that may result. The research is carried out in collaboration with the GGDs.